Promoting more physical activity and less sedentary behaviour in young people

Lecture_Biddle.png


Learning objectives: 

After successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

  1. Know how to define physical activity and provide practical examples that move beyond participating in sports to your patients.
  2. Know how to define sedentary behaviour and provide practical examples to your patients that reflect their modern lifestyles.
  3. Be able to explain, for paediatric patients and their parents, what are the already known drivers and barriers for daily physical activity.
  4. Be able to suggest actionable interventions that could help parents and their school-aged children adopt an active healthy lifestyle by increasing their regular physical activity and decreasing their sedentary behaviour.

Stuart J.H. Biddle is Professor of Physical Activity & Health in the School of Sport, Exercise & Health Sciences at Loughborough University, UK, and Executive Director (Academic & Research) in the British Heart Foundation National Centre for Physical Activity & Health at Loughborough. He is a theme lead for the National Institute for Health Research Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit. His first degree was in Physical Education, and this was followed by a masters' degree in the Psychology of Physical Activity and a PhD in Psychology. His research adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding and changing physical activity and sedentary behaviour. His research has had a strong focus on young people and he has been closely involved in the UK guidelines for physical activity and sedentary behaviour for both youth and adults. In 2009-10 he chaired the Government Department of Health's Expert Group on 'Sedentary Behaviour and Obesity' which led to sedentary behaviour guidelines. Professor Biddle is currently working a project on a family-based intervention to reduce snacking and screen time in children, has just completed an intervention designed to reduce sedentary behaviour in young adults at risk of diabetes, and is just starting an investigation on sedentary behaviour in older adults. He is a Past-President of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. Stuart is co-author of the book Psychology of physical activity (Routledge; 2nd edition, 2008; new edition in preparation) and co-editor of Youth physical activity and sedentary behavior: Challenges and solutions (Human Kinetics (2008).


Structure:
  • Introduction
  • Behavioral Framework. What is Physical Activity?
  • Active Vs Sedentary Lifestyles. Active and Sedentary Behaviours
  • The UK Situation Facts & Figures. Long-term Health Health Outcomes
  • Activity Drivers & Barriers to Physical Activity. Sedentary Behaviour Practical Advice. Increasing physical activity. Decreasing sitting time. Further Readings

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

connect

get updates